WBM? Section VI: The Schools and Colleges

This section presents information on advising and declaring a major in each of the seven schools and colleges that offer undergraduate majors in the biological sciences. image bird in long grass

If you decide on a major offered in a school or college other than the one you are currently enrolled in, you will need to transfer to that school or college. Usually this is simply a matter of filing a transfer form in the academic dean's office of the new school or college.

Four majors are offered through more than one school or college. Communicative Disorders is offered through both the College of Letters and Science and the School of Education. Three: Biochemistry, Biology and Microbiology- are offered in both the College of Letters and Science and the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. The requirements for each major are identical in both schools or colleges offering the major. However, the requirements outside of the major are dependent on the college.


The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences (CALS)

The College of Agricultural and Life Sciences provides students with a broad basic education while educating and preparing them for a wide variety of careers in research, business and industry, education, conservation and natural resource management, production and technical services.

Advising

All students have an assigned faculty or professional staff advisor. Entering freshmen and transfer students receive their advisor assignments from the Undergraduate Programs and Services Office based on their expressed interests. All students can change advisors within their department and receive a new advisor if they change majors.

Declaring a major

All students, including freshmen, are required to declare a degree program and/or major so that students can be paired with a faculty advisor. Students can change their major at any time by filling out a short form in the Undergraduate Programs and Services Office. It is useful for the student to select an initial major that is close to their interest (e.g. basic sciences, plant sciences, animal sciences), even though the major might change later.

For more information...

Look in the Undegraduate Catalog for the College of Agricultural and Life Sciences section or go to the college website: http://www.cals.wisc.edu/

Academic Dean's office

Undergraduate Programs and Services, 116 Agriculture Hall, (608) 262-3003, undergrads@cals.wisc.edu

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The College of Engineering

The College of Engineering offers a challenging, professionally oriented education in twelve undergraduate degree granting programs. An engineering education is an excellent route to responsible positions in technical careers, as well as to professional careers such as business, law, and medicine. Many employers in non-engineering industries consider engineering a desirable background for the technological demands of the future.

Students entering the college directly from high school are classified as entering engineering (EGR) students with an intended major (e.g., chemical engineering). Students enrolled elsewhere may transfer directly to an engineering-degree-granting department.

Advising

All EGR students are assigned an academic advisor through the Engineering General Resoruces Office, 1150 Engineering Hall. Students enrolled elsewhere are welcome to 262-2473 for an appointment to meet with one of these advisors.

After students are admitted to an engineering degree-granting department, they will either be assigned a faculty advisor or may seek advising from a faculty member. Students should follow the advising policies of their specific department.

Declaring a major

To be admitted to one of the engineering degree-granting departments, students must meet specific requirements, referred to as the General College Requirements or GCR. Acceptance into a department typically occurs at the end of the student's first year. EGR students may apply during the semester in which they fulfill the admissions requirement, and must qualify for a department in their fourth semester at the latest. Students enrolled elsewhere may apply during the semester they fulfill the admissions requirements; for these students, there is no point at which it is too late to apply for admission to an engineering department. Application forms are available in the Engineering General Resources Office, 1150 Engineering Hall. The normal application periods are: for spring semester- September 15 to November 1, for summer or fall semester- January 15 to March 1.

For more information...

See the College of Engineering section in the Undergraduate Catalog, website: http://www.engr.wisc.edu/. Also see the following website about qualifying and applying for a degree-granting program: http://studentservices.engr.wisc.edu/advising/internal_transfer.html.

Academic Dean's office

Engineering General Resources, 1150 Engineering Hall, (608) 262-2473, EGRadvisor@engr.wisc.edu.

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The College of Letters and Science (L&S)

The College of Letters and Science is the liberal arts college - and the largest college - on campus. A liberal arts education provides both a broad educational foundation in humanities, social studies, physical science, and biological science and the opportunity to explore one subject area in more depth by pursuing that interest as a major.

Advising

Students that enter the College of Letters and Science as new freshmen are assigned an advisor either in Cross College Advising Service (CCAS) or Letters and Sciences Advising Service (LSAS). Students entering the college not as new freshman will be assigned an advisor upon request at the appropriate advising office. L&S students who have an intended major receive their advising in the L&S Advising Service (Undergraduate Academic Services, 70 Bascom Hall, 608-262-5858) until they are eligible to declare their major(s) in the intended academic department(s). Those students who are still exploring options for majors are advised in the Cross-College Advising Service (10 Ingraham Hall, 608-265-5460). During the registration period, appointments must be scheduled with an advisor a week or more in advance, so planning is very important.

Declaring a major

Students must go to the individual academic departments/units within L&S to declare a major. Once students have declared a major they should be assigned to a departmental or major advisor. Assignment of an advisor is not automatic, so students should inquire in the departmental office about being assigned to an advisor.

Freshmen and sophomores can declare a major, but students are not required to have a declared major until their junior and senior years. Students wishing to declare a major should go to the appropriate departmental office to request an appointment with the designated individual who can assist students in filling out the "Declaration of Major" form. If a student decides to change his/her major, they should return to that departmental office to cancel his/her major.

For more information...

College of Letters and Science section in the Undergraduate Catalog, website: http://www.ls.wisc.edu/

Academic Dean's office

Undergraduate Academic Services, 70 Bascom Hall, (608) 262-5858, http://www.lssaa.wisc.edu/70bascom/

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The School of Education

The School of Education offers programs in a variety of disciplines, including the biological sciences. Students often enter the School of Education directly as “pre-professional” (e.g. Pre-Kinesiology) students before formal admission to their program.

Advising

Advisors at Education Academic Services (EAS), Rust - Schreiner Halls, 115 North Orchard Streetmassist students interested in these programs. Students are assigned an advisor and are strongly encouraged to meet regularly with her or him. Once admitted to a program, students will also have a faculty advisor.

Declaring a major

Students interested in the Communicative Disorders major must meet prerequisite course work and minimum grade-point average requirements. Eligible applicants are admitted to the program as juniors, but need to see an advisor in the Department of Communicative Disorders as soon as possible.

Admission to the following programs is limited and competitive, each program admits students once a year:

Students interested in the two Kinesiology degree options, Exercise and Movement Science and Athletic Training, must apply to these programs by Feb 1. Applicants are notified of their admission status in April and, if admitted, begin Kinesiology course work the following September.

Students interested in Secondary Biology Education must apply by February 1. Applicatns are notified of their admission status in the spring and, if admitted, will begin a sequence of professional education coursesthe following September. Some students interested in Agricultural Education apply to both programs and are admitted to Agricultural Education and Secondary Biology.

Find detailed program information for each of these programs at Education Academic Services, Rust - Schreiner Halls, 115 North Orchard Street, http://www.education.wisc.edu/eas. All programs above have specific program eligibility requirements, including specific course work, minimum credits, minimum grade-point averages, etc. Application materials are available from Education Academic Services after October 1 each year.

For more information...

Find materials on the Education Academic Services website: http://www.education.wisc.edu/eas. (Begining June 2009, the School of Education section in the Undergraduate Catalog will have the most current degree requirement and admission information.)

Academic Dean's office

Education Academic Services, Rust - Schreiner Halls, 115 North Orchard Street, (608) 262-1651

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The School of Medicine and Public Health

The School of Medicine and Public Health offers Bachelor of Science degrees in two undergraduate majors: Clinical Laboratory Science (Medical Technology) and Physician Assistant. Both programs have two years of prerequisite courses and competitive admissions processes for the final two years, or professional programs. Students not enrolled in PCL (Pre-Clinical Laboratory Science) or PPA (pre-Physician Assistant) classifications may apply for admission to the professional programs but should obtain advice on course requirements and professional application procedures from advisors in the program of their choice.

Note: We anticipate admitting the final undergraduate class to the Physician Assistant Program in summer 2009. We hope to admit the first professional Master’s Degree class in summer of 2010. The professional Master’s will require a prior Bachelor’s degree with certain prerequisite courses. Because of these changes, the pre-PA classification is no longer available to new or transfer students. Please check the program website for updates about the transition.

Advising

Individual academic advising appointments may be scheduled by calling the appropriate program office: Clinical Laboratory Science (262-2085); Physician Assistant (263-5620). Assistance with registration and interpretation of program requirements is available from the Student Services and Admissions Office (263-6800).

Declaring a major

Eligible on-campus students may transfer to the PCL preprofessional classification. Applicants to the professional programs must be able to complete all prerequisite courses before the professional programs begin. The application deadline is March 1 for Clinical Laboratory Science (Medical Technology), which begins the following fall semester. Starting in 2001, the PA program will participate in the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA). All applicants to the professional program will be required to submit both a CASPA application and a program supplemental application. Applications are submitted in the fall and the program starts the following summer early session. For deadlines and additional information, please visit the program website at www.medsch.wisc.edu/pa/. Students currently enrolled in other schools and colleges at U.W.-Madison will be transferred to the professional classifications if they are selected for the professional programs.

For more information...

Consult the Undergraduate Catalog, or call the program offices for printed information, website: http://www.med.wisc.edu/

Academic Dean's office

Student Services and Admissions Office, 1070 Medical Sciences Center, 1300 University Avenue, (608) 263-6800

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The School of Nursing

The School of Nursing offers an undergraduate program that prepares men and women for beginning positions in professional nursing. The curriculum is comprised of general education in the sciences, humanities, and social studies; nursing practice; and electives in both general education and nursing. Students spend their first two years taking course work to prepare them for consideration for admission to the nursing sequence of courses in the junior year.

Advising

Full-time advisors provide guidance for pre-nursing and nursing undergraduate students. Students who choose to pursue pre-nursing course work after they have been admitted to another classification should see a School of Nursing advisor for program planning.

Declaring a major

Students are admitted to the nursing sequence of courses in the junior year. Interested students should apply between October 1 and February 1. Admission is competitive. The seven prerequisite courses of Chemistry, Human Anatomy, Human Physiology, either Microbiology or Biochemistry, introductory Sociology, introductory Psychology, and Human Growth and Development must be completed by the end of spring semester, with at least four of the courses completed by the end of the fall semester.

For more information...

School of Nursing section in the Undergraduate Catalog, website: http://www.son.wisc.edu/

Academic Dean's office

Academic Programs Office, K6/146 Clinical Science Center, 600 Highland Ave, (608) 263-5202

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The School of Pharmacy

The School of Pharmacy offers two programs:

a) The Doctor of Pharmacy (Pharm.D.) degree is a professional program that leads toward licensure as a pharmacist. The Pharm.D. degree consists of two years of prepharmacy course work and four years of professional pharmacy course work.

b) The B.S. - Pharmacology & Toxicology degree is a four-year undergraduate program. It consists of two years of pre-pharmacology/toxicology course work and two years of course work in the major.

Completion of pre-School of Pharmacy course work does not guarantee admission to either the professional Pharm.D. program or the B.S. - Pharmacology & Toxicology program because there is a competitive admission process for each program.

Advising

Pre-School of Pharmacy advisors are available to provide information on opportunities and careers, admission criteria, application procedures and application deadlines. Advisors also help students to plan their pre-School of Pharmacy courses. Because students are admitted to the School of Pharmacy only in the fall semester, careful course programming is necessary. Students should contact a pre-School of Pharmacy advisor as soon as possible to obtain help in planning courses and up-to-date information about admission requirements, application procedures, and application deadlines.

Declaring a major

Admission to the Pharm.D, program and the B.S. – Pharmacology & Toxicology program is competitive, selective and requires a formal application process. Students interested in the Pharm.D. and/or the B.S. - Pharmacology & Toxicology programs should contact a pre-School of Pharmacy advisor to obtain information about admission criteria, application procedures and application deadlines.

For more information...

Contact the School of Pharmacy Student Services Office for referral to an advisor. School of Pharmacy Student Services Office, Rennebohm Hall, 777 Highland Ave. (608) 262-6234. Also see the School of Pharmacy section in the Undergraduate Catalog, and the School of Pharmacy website: http://www.pharmacy.wisc.edu/

Academic Dean's office

School of Pharmacy Main Office, 1126 Rennebohm Hall, 777 Highland Ave. (608) 262-1416

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